About the author:

Howard J. Luks, MD

Howard J. Luks, MD

A Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon in Hawthorne, NY. Dr. Howard Luks specializes in the treatment of the shoulder, knee, elbow, and ankle. He has a very "social" patient centric approach and believes that the more you understand about your issue, the more informed your decisions will be. Ultimately your treatments and his recommendations will be based on proper communications, proper understanding, and shared decision-making principles – all geared to improve your quality of life.

6 comments on “Shared Decision Making: Informed Consent v. Informed Choice #pm #In #hcsm

  • A real eye-opening insight! While more than half of our populace has a herd mentality of following the leader, a doctor in this case, it’ll be beneficial to create the culture of ‘Informed Consent’ to benefit the rest. Thanks, Dr. Luks

  • If the future is participatory medicine, a whole new area of shared decision making tools will need to develop. Your early results sound very promising.

  • Well articulated. I wonder how often this is lost on some proponents of too much praising of online information. Something important does get lost when the focus is on content versus context.Context (and historical context) is crucial in health care.

  • Thanks @Philbaumann … To your point of praising “too much” online info, check out my post this from this morning. What is the optimal structure for a participatory medicine “team”?

  • Shared decision making has a large following in breast cancer management with many articles and studies. Social media and SDM works hand in hand to improve care.Below is a section from:Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(3):CD001431.Update in: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(2):CD001431.Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions.The number of decision aids is expanding, but there is considerable overlap insome areas leaving gaps in others. Trials of decision aids indicate that theyare superior to usual care interventions in improving knowledge and realisticexpectations of the benefits and harms of options; reducing passivity indecision making; and lowering decisional conflict stemming from feelinguninformed. When simpler versions of decision aids are compared to more detailedaids, the differences in knowledge are marginal but there are other benefits interms of creating realistic expectations and in reducing decisional conflict. Todate, decision aids have had little effect on anxiety or satisfaction with thedecision making process or satisfaction with the decision. Their effects onchoices vary with the decision.

  • Shared decision making has a large following in breast cancer management with many articles and studies. Social media and SDM works hand in hand to improve care.Below is a section from:Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(3):CD001431.Update in: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(2):CD001431.Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions.The number of decision aids is expanding, but there is considerable overlap insome areas leaving gaps in others. Trials of decision aids indicate that theyare superior to usual care interventions in improving knowledge and realisticexpectations of the benefits and harms of options; reducing passivity indecision making; and lowering decisional conflict stemming from feelinguninformed. When simpler versions of decision aids are compared to more detailedaids, the differences in knowledge are marginal but there are other benefits interms of creating realistic expectations and in reducing decisional conflict. Todate, decision aids have had little effect on anxiety or satisfaction with thedecision making process or satisfaction with the decision. Their effects onchoices vary with the decision.

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